Posts filed under Issue 69

Eating Gluten Free at “Zingies” 

“Zingies” is a nickname that’s found its way to our house, which can refer to the Delicatessen, the Roadhouse, or even the Bakehouse at Zingerman’s. Whatever your family calls it, if you live in the Ann Arbor area, you can expect that family or friends will want to eat out at this delightful dining destination. “Making food that’s safe for our guests” is one of the mottos of the many-faceted food palace, and it’s good to know in advance what will be safe for you.  

Posted on July 31, 2018 and filed under Food & Nutrition, Issue 69.

Reflections on the Power of Music as Support and Healing for Teenagers

Last spring I heard Aaron Dworkin, violinist and former Dean of the U-M School of Music, Theater & Dance, speak at a leadership workshop at Zingerman’s Roadhouse. He expressed the best part of playing in a group/ensemble as a child was that he felt like he was ‘included’ for the first time in his life. Prior to this, he didn’t know anyone else like him and he lacked a sense of ‘belonging.’ He inspired me to investigate further. I wanted to hear from Ann Arbor students and teachers about their experience playing music in collaboration with others and what it means to them. 

Posted on May 5, 2018 and filed under Columns, Issue 69, Music, Parenting.

Raising Musical Kids--Musical Musings ~ A Peek Under the Roof of a Musical Household

It was clear to me that our family was “different” when it was the Ohio Michigan game, and instead of tailgating, we were all home watching a documentary of the history of jazz in America. At intermission, our dog ran figure eights around the multiple music stands and instruments that were scattered about the living room floor. Why the living room, you ask? There is no basement in our house. We like to think that by allowing kids to play in wide open spaces, it makes the whole house vibrate to some higher frequency. 

Posted on May 5, 2018 and filed under Issue 69, Parenting, Music.

Michigan Flower Growers’ Cooperative Brings Local Flowers to the Table

In the middle of the growing season in 2017, something brand new sprouted in Ann Arbor. Grown with care, the Michigan Flower Growers’ Cooperative was founded on July 5, 2017, and ran through the rest of the growing season with great success. Now, they’re approaching their second year of bringing locally-sourced flowers to southeast Michigan, serving everyone from local flower shops to DIY brides to individual consumers with beautiful blooms. 

Posted on May 1, 2018 and filed under CSA's, Farms, Issue 69.

The State of Bees

Imagine a living thing that has an effect on almost every food you eat. It also plays a role in the trees you see, the weeds you pull, and the coffee you drink each morning. Our entire ecosystem would be radically changed if these beings were to disappear. Bees are the tiny, hard working, often pesky pollinators that so graciously play a part in maintaining the delicate ecosystem we share. We need them, desperately, to be able to do their job: pollinate.

Posted on May 1, 2018 and filed under Animals, Farms, Issue 69.

Taking a Drive to Hidden Lake Gardens

There are few places left in our area where we can find natural gems that are virtually unknown yet created for the public’s use and enjoyment. Michigan State University owned and operated Hidden Lake Gardens is just one of those spots in Southeast Michigan within a short and scenic forty-five-minute drive from Ann Arbor. 

Posted on May 1, 2018 and filed under Issue 69, Nature, Public Parks.

Forest Therapy ~ Embracing Nature, Connecting with Others

On the night before winter solstice in 2017, I was part of a small group that set out at dusk from the parking lot at Matthaei Botanical Gardens, carrying paper globes as we entered the adjacent woods on a footpath. Our guide, Ann Arbor artist and art teacher Cayla Samano, had distributed the lanterns beforehand. As darkness came down around us, the light-sensitive globes turned on, bright white orbs in the shadowy woods. Ice and snow crunched underfoot. We took our time, Cayla reminding us not to rush, asking us to slow our pace. 

Zooooooooooooooooooom. Zoooooooooooooooooooo-ooooooom ~ Chase Me Now! Taming the Crazy that is Puppyhood

In the World of Dog, evening crazies are actually a thing, particularly in puppies. “International Puppy Zoomie Time” often occurs between 7:00-9:00 p.m., on a nightly basis, immediately before your new youngster crashes for the evening. You hope. Or, it may not be until the early hours of the morning.

Posted on May 1, 2018 and filed under Animals, Issue 69, Pets.